The Dictionary of Traditional Magick and Etherical Science #21

The Dictionary of Traditional Magick and Etherical Science #21

 

A column by Gerald del Campo, The Dictionary of Traditional Magic and Etherical Science features ten author-selected definitions per issue. The definitions included in Mr. del Campo’s Dictionary do not necessarily reflect the views of the administrators or other contributors of this magazine.

Agnostic

(Gnostic) Someone who claims that they do not know or are unable to know whether God exists.

Altruism

(Philosophy) Actions performed for the sake of others are altruistic. Altruism is the hypothesis that morality involves acting for the sake of others.

Belief

Trust.

Clairvoyance

(Magick, divination) Literally, “clear seeing,” also known as skrying or scrying. The astral art of acquiring visions, images and other information. The actual technique used is very similar to Astral Projection. Clairvoyance has been taught by numerous magical orders in order to investigate the archetypal nature of magical symbols, or to view real-life locations. It was extensively used in England during WWII to spy on the Nazis and again in Russia during The Cold War to spy on the U.S.

Foundationalism

(Philosophy) An epistemological view which maintains that there are two kinds of knowledge or beliefs: basic beliefs, which are obvious or self-justifying, and non-basic beliefs, which are justified by basic beliefs. The basic beliefs explain why the justification of knowledge does not involve an Infinite Regress.

Hatha Yoga

(Yoga) Sanskrit. Gives mastery over the breath, and leads to the control of the physical body and vitality.

Iosis

(Alchemy) The third and final stage of alchemical transformation. Because it is marked by the purpling or reddening of the material during the Coagulation operation, it is also known as the “Purple Phase.”

Kala

A ray, star, digit of time, radiance, essence, perfume. The vital psychosomatic essence which is manifest as a result of Maithuna (linking, joining, as in Tantra), these are considered to be 16 in number, 8 manifesting from the female and 8 from the male. The Tantric “glow” of the Kala will be different according to the digit in time where, when, and with whom the Tantra is worked.

Logic

(Philosophy) The branch of philosophy that deals with the formal properties of arguments and the philosophical problems associated with them. Central questions in logic include: What is a good argument? How can we determine if an argument is good or not? What are paradoxes? Can they be resolved? How can we talk meaningfully about objects that don’t exist, such as God or fairies?

Paten

(Ecclesiastic) A plate, usually of gold or silver that is used to hold the host during the Mass. Also called a “patina.”

©2008-2013 Gerald del Campo. Edited by Sheta Kaey.

Gerald del Campo has authored three books on the subject of Thelema: A Heretic’s Guide to Thelema, New Aeon Magick: Thelema Without Tears, and New Aeon English Qabalah Revealed. He is a photographer, musician and CEO for the Order of Thelemic Knights, the first Thelemic charitable organization. You can visit his blog at http://solis93.livejournal.com and his websites at http://thelemicknights.org and http://egoandtheids.com. Gerald formerly served as Senior Managing Editor of Rending the Veil.

The Dictionary of Traditional Magick and Etherical Science #20

The Dictionary of Traditional Magick and Etherical Science #20

 

A column by Gerald del Campo, The Dictionary of Traditional Magic and Etherical Science features ten author-selected definitions per issue. The definitions included in Mr. del Campo’s Dictionary do not necessarily reflect the views of the administrators or other contributors of this magazine.

Alembic

(Alchemy) In alchemy, the top part of a still. Often used to refer to a complete still. An instrument used for distillation.

Archigenitor

(Gnostic) The “first begetter”. A Greek reference to Yaldabaoth.

Cenobite

(Ecclesiastic) A member of a religious order choosing to dwell within a convent, monastery or a community, as opposed to a hermit, who lives in solitude.

Evocation

(Magick, Religion) Literally, “calling out.” Evocation is the application of magick to cause the physical or astral guise of a spirit to appear. See Invocation.

Filtration

(Alchemy) A process of separation, in which material is passed through a sieve or screen designed to allow only pieces of a certain size to pass through. In alchemy, the procedure is illustrated by the sign of Sagittarius.

Gunas

(Yoga) Sanskrit The Gunas are the three basic principles in Ayurvedic medicine that represent the process through which the subtle becomes gross. They are defined as consciousness or essense (sattva), activity (rajas), and inactivity (tamas). These principles also correspond with the alchemic principles of Mercury, Sulfur and Salt.

Psychological Egoism

(Philosophy) The doctrine that a person actually pursues nothing but his own interests. Note carefully how it differs from Ethical Egoism.

Rationalism

(Philosophy) The doctrine that genuine knowledge is not established by sense-experience, or at least not by sense-experience alone, and so is wholly or at least to a significant extent A Priori. Contrast Empiricism.

Triangle

(Alchemy, magick, general usage) One of the most stable geometric designs. In alchemy, the triangle represents the three alchemical principles: Mercury, Sulfur and Salt. In magick, demons are invoked into a triangle.

Undine

(Alchemy) One of a class of fabled female water spirits. They have the advantage of receiving a human soul by intermarrying with a mortal.

©2010 by Gerald del Campo.
Edited by Sheta Kaey.

Gerald del Campo has authored three books on the subject of Thelema: A Heretic’s Guide to Thelema, New Aeon Magick: Thelema Without Tears, and New Aeon English Qabalah Revealed. He is a photographer, musician and CEO for the Order of Thelemic Knights, the first Thelemic charitable organization. You can visit his blog at http://solis93.livejournal.com and his websites at http://thelemicknights.org and http://egoandtheids.com. Gerald formerly served as Senior Managing Editor of Rending the Veil.

The Dictionary of Traditional Magick and Etherical Science #19

The Dictionary of Traditional Magick and Etherical Science #19

 

A column by Gerald del Campo, The Dictionary of Traditional Magic and Etherical Science features ten author-selected definitions per issue. The definitions included in Mr. del Campo’s Dictionary do not necessarily reflect the views of the administrators or other contributors of this magazine.

Akashic Record

(Yoga, Theosophy) A term invented and popularized by Helena Petrovna Blavatsky. The idea is that the Akasha is a thought substance which can be imprinted by experience, making it possible to retrieve otherwise inaccessible information from the past, such as a person’s past life. This is remarkably close idea to the concept of Jung’s Universal Unconscious and may in fact be a reference to the same phenomena.

Aponia

(Gnostic) Literally, “Unreason.” The act of misusing thought.

Child

(Alchemy) A naked child symbolizes the perfect intelligence, the innocent soul. In alchemy and in magical tomes, the child represents the Union of Opposites. A crowned child or child clothed in purple robes signifies Salt or the Philosopher’s Stone.

Descriptive Meaning

(Philosophy) A statements or declaration whose meaning is shown in terms of reporting or describing actual or possible facts have descriptive meaning. Compare to Emotive Meaning.

Egg

(Alchemy) The egg represents the hermetically sealed vessel of creation. In alchemy, corked retorts, coffins, and sepulchers represent the same principles.

Gold

(Alchemy) The most perfect of all the metals, gold in ages past represented the perfection of all matter on any level, including that of the mind, spirit, and soul. The Sun is often used to hint to gold.

Maggid

(Qabalah) Hebrew Master or teacher. Synonymous with the Holy Guardian Angel, Higher Self, etc.

Mercury

(Alchemy, Roman mythology) The smallest of the inner planets and the one nearest the sun. The Roman god of pranks, thievery and commerce, which says something of how Romans conducted their business affairs. Called Hermes by the Greeks, Mercury is the messenger for the other gods, as well as being the god of science and travel, and patron saint of athletes. He is typically represented as a young man wearing a winged helmet and sandals and holding a caduceus. Mercury is also a heavy, metallic silver poisonous element that is liquid at room temperature. Often used in scientific instruments. Also called also quicksilver, alchemists acquired it by roasting cinnabar (mercury sulfide). The mercury would sweat out of the rocks and drip down where it could be collected. When mixed with other metals, liquid mercury has a tendency to bond with them and develop amalgams. These properties seemed to make mercury the master of duality in solid and liquid states; earth and heaven; life and death, and the Above and Below.

Philosophy of Science

(Philosophy) The branch of philosophy which scrutinizes the nature and results of scientific inquiry. Central questions include: Do scientist describe reality or just appearances? Can we have good reason to believe in the existence of unobservable entities (e.g. quarks)? What happens when one scientific theory replaces an older theory?

Ruach ha Kodesh

(Qabalah) Hebrew The child of the Supernals, she is the unmanifested essence that lingers like a curtain beneath her parents. Marked on the Tree of Life by the illusive, non-Sephirah Daath, or Knowledge. It is a portal through which the Absolute may enter to intervene directly with existence. Mystic Christians think of Daath as The Holy Spirit.

©2009 by Gerald del Campo.
Edited by Sheta Kaey.

Gerald del Campo has authored three books on the subject of Thelema: A Heretic’s Guide to Thelema, New Aeon Magick: Thelema Without Tears, and New Aeon English Qabalah Revealed. He is a photographer, musician and CEO for the Order of Thelemic Knights, the first Thelemic charitable organization. You can visit his blog at http://solis93.livejournal.com and his websites at http://thelemicknights.org and http://egoandtheids.com. Gerald formerly served as Senior Managing Editor of Rending the Veil.

Book Review: Academy of the Sword

April 14, 2009 by  
Filed under books, hermeticism, martial arts, reviews



Academy of the Sword: The Mystery of the Spanish Circle in Swordsmanship and Esoteric Arts
by John Michael Greer (Trans) Gerard Thibault
Chivalry Bookshelf (October 18, 2006) $59.95
ISBN 978-1891448409
328 pages
Reviewer: Jeff Richardson
Full starFull starFull starFull starFull star

First published in 1630 in French, Gerard Thibault’s Academy of the Sword stands as one of the most lavish treatises ever written on the art of civilian swordplay. This translation was nearly ten years in the works and was eagerly anticipated by the historical fencing community. John Michael Greer’s understanding of the time period, historical philosophy, and language make this text an excellent resource. The plates from the original text are recreated in excellent high quality and make this work worth having all by themselves. These engraved plates were done by a small army of some the best and most famous engravers in Europe. Sadly, many of the original historical copies of this text have had the lavishly illustrated plates removed and sold individually at art auctions for extremely high prices.

This text has in the past been largely, and unfairly dismissed by fencing scholars and historians as “overcomplicated” and “unimportant.” At first daunting, a study of Thibault’s detailed description of his fencing system reveals an elegant and systematic system of swordplay, a system which was studied widely by the social elite of Europe and taught at the University of Leiden by Thibault himself. Described in intimate detail is the use of the rapier alone to fence against an opponent with single rapier, rapier and dagger, rapier and shield, or longsword. In addition, written down possibly for the first time in history, the book describes how to use zigzag running to come up on a man using a musket to fire at the swordsman. Thibault’s attention to detail is refreshing in the efforts to re-learn a dead art, as these details are so often lacking to the Historical European Martial Arts enthusiast. Adding value to this work is that historical fencers are actively studying this system of rapier and the translator travels with them to lecture at fencing seminars.

As a scholarly translation of a historical renaissance text this book is brilliant. As a book of reproductions of renaissance illustrations it is also brilliant. The illustrations are beautifully reproduced, and they are incredible in themselves, engaging the reader as much as the text. The line etchings are a testament to the art by some of the best etchers in history and so packed with ornamentation and fine detail as to inspire staring at them for hours. In addition to fencing, the book is a unique look into the historical, social, philosophical and esoteric culture of Europe in the late 16th century. Thibault was a mathematician, philosopher, architect and physician. He brought to his writings a wealth of mathematical and scientific knowledge, along with a philosophy replete with mystical thought.

As a study for historical hermetic thought and the art of memory, this book is enlightening. The illustrations reveal possibly our best look inside the mind of a 16th century practitioner of the art of memory.

The first chapter of the book quotes extensively from the writings of German occultist, astrologer and alchemist Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa von Nettesheim. Indeed, illustrations on the highly detailed emblem plates show Agrippa’s four elemental postures of man. Thibault discusses philosophy and sacred geometry (the proportions of man as they relate to the circle) and states, “learn first of all that the philosophers attribute to the Microcosm, the human body, diverse figures, of which the triangle, square and pentagon will be discussed elsewhere.” Thibault makes a clear reference to the Pythagorean philosophical school and teachings with this reference. He then goes on to show how proportion is the basis for the study of the sword.

The numbers 3, 5, 9, 10 and 12 are prominent in the text. From purely the mechanical aspects, there are 3 distances, 9 degrees of blade pressure or “sentiment,” and the diagram of the circle and square is devised on a numerical system of 8 and 10. The numbers 5 and 10 of course are, according to the Pythagoreans, symbolic of the microcosm and macrocosm, and Thibault’s diagram proportioned to the individual conceals a squared circle. Thibault divides the sword into twelve sections, the strongest section being near the hilt and gripped by the hand. He provides imagery of the zodiacal repeatedly, hinting at its influence on the work, accompanied with little clocks showing the hour. In addition, his discussion of the sword itself uses these numbers and, together with his discussion of influences upon it, reveal a striking correlation to Robert Fludd’s monochord and the Great Chain of Being. Is there an alchemical process for the individual swordsman to pursue, a seeking of purity of self? Thibault does indeed make reference to alchemical purification. Is the discussion of influences on the sword and depiction of a hand holding the sword with its descending numbers akin to Fludd’s monochord, tuned by the hand of God with its descending influence through the cosmic divine harmony to the earth? Thibault states that all movements take place in a circle, “extending from the center of its strength out to the extreme circumference of its weakness.” Do we see the reverse of Fludd’s monochord, or an acknowledgement of the influence running in both directions? There are twelve divisions in the popular view of the cosmic model of the day, the first 4 being the common elements, followed by the 7 planets, and the last being the outer sphere of the primum mobile. We may never know the true answers to these and other questions raised by this treatise… but the path to discovery is a fascinating one.

Many years in the making, the book was published after Thibault died and before he could write the section on combat from horseback.

Thibault’s text was lauded as the most elaborately and lavishly illustrated book on fencing ever created. The pictures from the original are highly sought after by collectors. This text is a must have for art collectors, historical martial artists, or those interested in the history of hermetic studies.

Review content ©2009 Jeff Richardson
Edited by Sheta Kaey

The Dictionary of Traditional Magick and Etherical Science #13

The Dictionary of Traditional Magick and Etherical Science #13

 

A column by Gerald del Campo, The Dictionary of Traditional Magic and Etherical Science features ten author-selected definitions per issue. The definitions included in Mr. del Campo’s Dictionary do not necessarily reflect the views of the administrators or other contributors of this magazine.

Aludel

(Alchemy) An earthenware condenser used in the sublimation process of alchemy. It is a symbol for the last stages of transformation. Also known as a Hermetic Vase, or the Philosopher’s Egg.

Arcana

Pre-existing powers that have the potential of transmuting, changing, and restoring. In alchemy, the “One Mind.” Synonymous with the secret workings of the mind of God and/or the Greek logos. In the tarot, the arcana manifest as symbolic drawings that the reader must work out through meditation. In the Qabalah, the arcana manifest as the obscure properties of the Hebrew letters and their relation to the Tree of Life. In the I Ching, the arcana appear in the form of sixty-four trigrams. In alchemy, the arcana are hidden everywhere, particularly in chemical compounds, metals and the transmutation of one thing into another.

Chi

In Taoism, the vital force believed to be inherent in all things. The unhindered flow of Chi and a balance of its negative and positive energies in the body are held to be essential to good health in traditional Chinese medicine. Similar to the Hindu prana.

Dalmatic

(Ecclesiastic) A wide-sleeved garment worn by Deacons over the alb during the celebration of Mass.

Elyonim

(Qabalah) Hebrew “Those who dwell above.” A reference to the angels and archangels that exist in the three higher worlds in the Tree of Life. A reference to the Elyonim is made in Genesis 1:26 in the form of “fish” and the “fowl” that swim in the Waters of Yetzirah and fly in the Air of Briah.

Shadow

(Psychology) Opposite of persona. An unconscious aspect of the self, neither good nor evil, which the ego has never acknowledged or repressed. The realization of the shadow is inhibited by the persona. Repressed desires, uncivilized impulses, fantasies, resentments, even positive moral values: anything the individual does not like about himself has the potential of becoming a shadow. If these qualities remain suppressed, they can often be experienced in others through the mechanism of projection, and this is the greatest tool at the hands of the magician for discovering them. There is no sure operation for absorbing the shadow; it is more a matter of subtlety and diplomacy. The first step is to accept the existence of the shadow. Next, one has to become aware of its nature and purpose through the observation of one’s moods, fantasies and impulses. The magi can then Qabalistically interpret its nature to find a manner in which the shadow can be creatively expressed. Another, more risky method which should not be used without guidance is to allow the persona and the shadow to utterly destroy one another, thereby allowing a new form of consciousness to arise from the ashes; this is illustrated in the Phoenix myths. The shadow often makes its appearance in dreams, as a member of the same sex.

Solipsism

(Philosophy) A form of skepticism, the belief that nothing exists except my mind and the creations of my mind.

Sufficient condition

(Philosophy) X is a sufficient condition of Y, if where there is X, there is also Y. Therefore, raising a child is a sufficient condition of being a parent, and having a driver’s license is a sufficient condition of knowing how to drive. Contrast with necessary condition.

Zel Shaddai

(Qabalah) Hebrew The Shadow of God. The visible world and natural occurrence are regarded as the consequences of God’s concealment. Nature is regarded as God’s shadow. For example: Shadows divulge the existence of light. Death is what gives our lives meaning.

©2008-2013 Gerald del Campo. Edited by Sheta Kaey.

Gerald del Campo has authored three books on the subject of Thelema: A Heretic’s Guide to Thelema, New Aeon Magick: Thelema Without Tears, and New Aeon English Qabalah Revealed. He is a photographer, musician and CEO for the Order of Thelemic Knights, the first Thelemic charitable organization. You can visit his blog at http://solis93.livejournal.com and his websites at http://thelemicknights.org and http://egoandtheids.com. Gerald formerly served as Senior Managing Editor of Rending the Veil.

The Dictionary of Traditional Magick and Etherical Science #12

The Dictionary of Traditional Magick and Etherical Science #12

 

A column by Gerald del Campo, The Dictionary of Traditional Magic and Etherical Science features ten author-selected definitions per issue. The definitions included in Mr. del Campo’s Dictionary do not necessarily reflect the views of the administrators or other contributors of this magazine.

A posteriori

(Logic) The opposite of a piori. A posteriori knowledge can be established only by experience or reasoning from experience. Example: There are nine planets in the solar system. Empirical is a synonym for a posteriori.

Epistemology

(Logic) A branch of philosophy that involves the study of knowledge.

Materialism

(Philosophy) The assertion that only material things exist. Often used in Philosophy of Mind, in response to the claim that mental objects and events cannot be reduced to physical objects and events.

Nachash

(Qabalah) Hebrew The serpent in Genesis that convinced Eve to eat from the Tree of Knowledge. It is the power which imprisons and sets free.

Necessary condition

(Philosophy) X is a necessary condition of Y if there cannot be Y without X. Therefore, being a parent is a necessary condition of raising a child. Compare with sufficient condition.

Notarikon

(Qabalah) A way of creating acronyms and/or new words from other words or phrases that are believed to contain magical powers. For example: The biblical phrase “Thou art great forever, Lord” — Ateh Gibor Le Olahm Adoni can be summed up as AGLA.

Ontology

(Philosophy) The branch of metaphysics that studies the nature of existence. Some central questions include: What kinds of objects exist? What does it mean for something to exist?

Pelican

(Alchemy) A circulatory container with two arms feeding condensed vapors back into the body. It has a cunning similarity in shape to a pelican pecking at its own breast.

Political Philosophy

(Philosophy) The branch of philosophy that discusses freedom, justice, rights, democracy and other political issues. Central questions include: Is democracy the best form of government? How can we balance rights and responsibilities?

Thelemapoly

(From the author’s personal lexicon) 1) The present day phenomenon of grabbing as much as the Crowleyan pie as possible, such as copyrights and the status that “knowing” Crowley endows upon the insecure, culture-lacking pseudo-intellectuals. 2) a popular board game played by Crowleyites where the object is to use ones Crowleyness to grab a big a part of ThelemaLand as possible at any cost.

©2008-2013 Gerald del Campo. Edited by Sheta Kaey.

Gerald del Campo has authored three books on the subject of Thelema: A Heretic’s Guide to Thelema, New Aeon Magick: Thelema Without Tears, and New Aeon English Qabalah Revealed. He is a photographer, musician and CEO for the Order of Thelemic Knights, the first Thelemic charitable organization. You can visit his blog at http://solis93.livejournal.com and his websites at http://thelemicknights.org and http://egoandtheids.com. Gerald formerly served as Senior Managing Editor of Rending the Veil.

The Dictionary of Traditional Magick and Etherical Science #11

The Dictionary of Traditional Magick and Etherical Science #11

 

A column by Gerald del Campo, The Dictionary of Traditional Magic and Etherical Science features ten author-selected definitions per issue. The definitions included in Mr. del Campo’s Dictionary do not necessarily reflect the views of the administrators or other contributors of this magazine.

Abramelin

(Magic) The main character in The Book of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage, a medieval grimoire in three parts, translated and edited by S. L. Macgregor Mathers and popularized by Aleister Crowley.

Ablution

(Religious usage) A spiritual washing with water. In the process of ablution, one faces one’s emotions and then lets them go so that innocence and purity can be restored.

Deductive argument

(Logic) An argument in which the premises are intended to provide a guarantee of the truth of the conclusion. In this type of argument, the premises are intended to provide such strong support for the conclusion that, if the premises were true, it would be impossible for the conclusion to be false. For example:
All philosophers are wise. — premise
Socrates is a philosopher. — premise
Therefore: Socrates is wise. — conclusion

Enochian magick

(Magick) A distinct magical system pioneered by Dr. John Dee and Sir Edward Kelley in England during the 16th century. Dee and Kelley claimed to have received the system from angels who had been in contact with Enoch himself, hence the name Enochian. This system is reportedly much more powerful than most traditional forms of ceremonial magick, and there is no shortage of stories warning the user against jumping in without preparation. Enochian magick is an important part of the Golden Dawn’s work.

Eroturgy

(Hermetic) The practice and study of sex magick.

First person authority

(Logic) A classic example of a first person authority is the claim that one is in pain. This cannot be falsely believed.

Geber

(Alchemy) The Latin name for the father of Islamic and European alchemy, Jabir ibn Hayyan (721 – ??? A.D.). He lived in what is now known as Iran, and spread the doctrines of the four elements and the mercury-sulfur theory of the generation of the metals. The date of his death is unknown, although some scholars suggest it may have been in 815 A.D. He was the son of a druggist, and a Sufi who may have had allegiance with the infamous Assassins of Hashim, who fed on hashish and committed political assassinations. He wrote that the base of all metals were mercury and sulfur, and by breaking down worthless metals (such as lead) to these components, one could make gold by recombining these elements in the right proportions. This was allegedly accomplished via a substance he called “elixir,” which could not itself change gold into another metal — but by adding elixir to gold, one could produce a liquid or substance believed to confer (among other things) immortality. It seemed perfectly logical to assume that a substance so miraculous could also have other medicinal properties, such as restoring youth, prolonging life, or curing all disease. Hence, he popularized the idea of the Philosopher’s Stone, or Elixir of Life, which would obsess the minds of alchemists and magicians for hundreds of years. He discovered ammonium chloride, and illustrated how to process white lead. He pioneered the use of weak acids, such as vinegar and nitric acid, and made many advances in metal refining. Perhaps his most important contribution is the care he took in recording his chemical experiments.

Goetia

(Magick) Greek, literally meaning “howling.” As a common term, Goetia indicates a so-called “low magick,” involving the evocation and manipulation of evil spirits. The idea is that these lesser demons can be forced into service of the magician to help him achieve his goals. “The Goetia” is a section of a grimoire known as the Lesser Key of Solomon which was translated by Macgregor Mathers and later edited by Aleister Crowley. Evidently, this work led to their falling out.

Lead

(Alchemy) In Hermetic Qabalah, lead is attributed to the planet Saturn, and the third sephirah Binah, which means Understanding. In alchemy, lead is the first and oldest of the seven metals.

Line of succession

(Religion, magick) The assumption that only a properly initiated teacher can effectively initiate others. The idea is that genuine initiates should be able to show an unbroken line of succession, back to the originator their tradition. This was probably borrowed from Catholicism, which claims to have Apostolic Succession and that the Pope can trace his origins back to Christ himself. Some magical organizations have deliberately faked their own origins to impress students.

Lucid dreaming

(Magick) A phenomenon, perhaps a form of astral projection, in which one is aware of dreaming without waking up, and can therefore control the direction and content of the vision. It is possible to teach oneself how to lucid dream and many magicians employ various techniques and tools to accomplish this state. One such method is to take mega dozes of specific dietary supplements.

©2008-2013 Gerald del Campo. Edited by Sheta Kaey.

Gerald del Campo has authored three books on the subject of Thelema: A Heretic’s Guide to Thelema, New Aeon Magick: Thelema Without Tears, and New Aeon English Qabalah Revealed. He is a photographer, musician and CEO for the Order of Thelemic Knights, the first Thelemic charitable organization. You can visit his blog at http://solis93.livejournal.com and his websites at http://thelemicknights.org and http://egoandtheids.com. Gerald formerly served as Senior Managing Editor of Rending the Veil.

The Dictionary of Traditional Magick and Etherical Science #10

The Dictionary of Traditional Magick and Etherical Science #10

 

A column by Gerald del Campo, The Dictionary of Traditional Magic and Etherical Science features ten author-selected definitions per issue. The definitions included in Mr. del Campo’s Dictionary do not necessarily reflect the views of the administrators or other contributors of this magazine.

Begging the question

(Logic) Flawed reasoning in which one needs to already to have established the conclusion in order to be entitled to assert one of the premises offered in support of the conclusion one is trying to establish. Consequently, the argument assumes the truth of the very point one is trying to prove. (e.g., Joe did not steal this money because he is not a thief.) Compare with circular argument.

Briah

(Qabalah) Hebrew The World of Creation. The world of ideas.

Builders of the Adytum

(Magical institution) A magical order with its roots in Hebrew and Christian mysticism, founded by Paul Foster Case in 1921 after having allegedly met with one of The Masters, known as Rakocsi, in a New York hotel room. Similarly fashioned after the Golden Dawn, but with a strong emphasis on the tarot and a system of called “The Cube of Space.”

Chiah

(Qabalah) Hebrew The true Will, the immortal component of the Soul. The creative will, which causes one to reach outside one’s perceived limitations.

Circular argument

(Logic) Flawed reasoning in which it is argued both that A is the case on the grounds that B is the case, and that B is the case on the grounds that A is the case. (Consider the argument that there is a god because it is reliably stated in our holy book, and that the holy book is reliable because it is divinely inspired.) Compare with begging the question.

Transignification

A term used to describe the physical presence of the subject invoked during Mass. In the Roman Catholic Mass, it is a term to describe the real presence of Christ at Mass. We see it used in Liber XV when the Lion and Serpent are called by the Priest. The theory is that the subject doesn’t become substantially present, but that at the words of consecration the elements take on the real significance of Christ, so that He is sacramentally present. This concept is based on the thought that there are two kinds of presence, local and personal. Jesus is personally, but not locally, present at the Mass.

Tzuddakah

(Qabalah) Hebrew Charity. Giving without a sense of attachment, to the extent of not even feeling good about oneself for doing so.

Yantra yoga

(Yoga) Gives mastery over form, and leads to the control of the powers of geometrical form.

Zahzahoth

(Qabalah) Hebrew The three unmanifest principles symbolized by the Three Pillars, or Hidden Splendors, which preside over the ten sephiroth: Mildness, Mercy, and Severity, or Will, Justice, and Mercy.

Wolf

(Alchemy) An animal depicted in alchemy to mean antimony. See antimony.

©2008-2013 Gerald del Campo. Edited by Sheta Kaey.

Gerald del Campo has authored three books on the subject of Thelema: A Heretic’s Guide to Thelema, New Aeon Magick: Thelema Without Tears, and New Aeon English Qabalah Revealed. He is a photographer, musician and CEO for the Order of Thelemic Knights, the first Thelemic charitable organization. You can visit his blog at http://solis93.livejournal.com and his websites at http://thelemicknights.org and http://egoandtheids.com. Gerald formerly served as Senior Managing Editor of Rending the Veil.

The Dictionary of Traditional Magick and Etherical Science #9

The Dictionary of Traditional Magick and Etherical Science #9

 

A column by Gerald del Campo, The Dictionary of Traditional Magic and Etherical Science features ten author-selected definitions per issue. The definitions included in Mr. del Campo’s Dictionary do not necessarily reflect the views of the administrators or other contributors of this magazine.

Allogenes

(Gnostic) A term used by the Gnostics to identify themselves and their relationship to the physical world. Literally means “alien.” The Gnostic identifies with the Spirit, thus he is “alien” to the physical world.

Angel

A spiritual being with its own unique substance, traits, and temperament that exists in the world of Yetzirah but can affect events in the physical plane. They often serve as messengers between men and gods. They are impulse driven, highly specialized and always behave within the limits imposed upon them by their function. Some texts claim that prayer can create temporary angels to send the message up through the various planes of existence to a god. In the desert religions, an angel is a typically benevolent, unearthly creature that is believed to act as intermediary between heaven and earth. In alchemy, an angel is symbolic of sublimation or the ascension of the volatile principle.

Antimony

(Alchemy) A metal that symbolizes the animal nature of man and/or nature. Latin, meaning “anti-monk,” because a handful of monks died from ingesting it. The alchemist Basil Valentine is credited for naming the metal after feeding it to some Benedictine monks. The more fortunate monks became violently sick, and the others died. It is rumored that Basil Valentine administered the antimony to help the monks deal with their animal nature. Coincidentally, the tincture of Antimony cures venereal diseases. Wink-wink. Nudge-nudge.

Balsam

(Alchemy) A resinous, semi-solid compound that encapsulates the quintessence of liquid medicines or perfumes. According to Paracelsus, balsam inhibits decomposition. Mercury was considered the balsamic agent of the metals, because it had similar qualities as a solid and as a liquid.

Caduceus

(Greek mythology, Yoga, Alchemy) The staff of Hermes, the Messenger of the Gods and professor of alchemy. A staff entwined by two serpents representing the solar and lunar forces. In yoga, the serpents represent Ida and Pingala, while the staff itself is Sushumna. The symbol suggests the method by which to obtain the Philosopher’s Stone, which corresponds to the golden ball with wings at the very top of the caduceus.

Christianitys

(From the author’s personal lexicon) A sometimes deadly mental disorder with characteristics that include repeating Bible verses one does not understand. See Thelemitys.

Thelemitys

(From the author’s personal lexicon) A sometimes deadly mental disorder with characteristics that include repeating Liber AL verses one does not understand. See Christianitys.

Valid

(Philosophy) An argument is valid if the truth of the premise(s) demand we assert the truth of the conclusion. What is valid or invalid is an argument; what is true or false is a proposition. Therefore, it is wise to avoid the hybrid phrase “valid proposition.”

Yetzirah

(Qabalah) Hebrew The World of Formation. One of the Four Worlds on the Tree of Life. It can be compared to the phase in which an idea, which the architect has willed (Atziluth) and creatively defined (Briah), takes detailed form before its actual construction in Assiah. Also called the realm of differentiation and obstacles.

Zohar

(Qabalah) Hebrew First appearing in Spain during the late thirteenth century, the Book of Splendor by Moses del Leon is considered the “bible” of the Kabbalah.

©2008-2013 Gerald del Campo. Edited by Sheta Kaey.

Gerald del Campo has authored three books on the subject of Thelema: A Heretic’s Guide to Thelema, New Aeon Magick: Thelema Without Tears, and New Aeon English Qabalah Revealed. He is a photographer, musician and CEO for the Order of Thelemic Knights, the first Thelemic charitable organization. You can visit his blog at http://solis93.livejournal.com and his websites at http://thelemicknights.org and http://egoandtheids.com. Gerald formerly served as Senior Managing Editor of Rending the Veil.

The Dictionary of Traditional Magick and Etherical Science #8

The Dictionary of Traditional Magick and Etherical Science #8

 

A column by Gerald del Campo, The Dictionary of Traditional Magic and Etherical Science features ten author-selected definitions per issue. The definitions included in Mr. del Campo’s Dictionary do not necessarily reflect the views of the administrators or other contributors of this magazine.

A priori

(Logic) A priori knowledge is comprehension which can be established independently of experience or reasoning from experience. Examples of a priori truths: Boys are male; 1+1=2; etc. Analytic truths are a priori. See rationalism.

Persona

(Psychology) The “I.” Originating from the Latin, meaning “mask.” The persona is the outer shell that the individual presents to the outside world. It is something that one is not, but which one believes oneself to be, a protective device designed to win social approval. The persona is socially forced by society as a means of human interaction; it is an unconscious compromise between the individual and society. Society rewards the appropriate desirable persona with money, respect, and power. It is an unconscious compromise between the individual and society. When we adhere, or try to become, our persona at the expense of who we are, we gamble with neurosis. We risk abandoning the our understanding of who we are, to adopt actions and behavior which are dictated by social pressure.

Prog-Gnosis

(From the author’s personal lexicon) Having intimate knowledge of progressive rock music.

Persona Non Grata

Latin 1) An unacceptable or unwelcome person, especially to a foreign government. 2) A disavowed representative of a government or organization. 3) What a person becomes when they piss off the higher-ups of a certain Thelemic organization.

Processional Cross

(Ecclesiastic) This cross is carried into church at the head of a mass procession. It is symbolic of the congregation’s sect, or a sign of their beliefs.

Quintessence

(Alchemy) The fifth alchemical element. A spark of living fire, a piece of the Absolute believed to animate all living things. See soul.

Rakiah

(Qabalah) Hebrew The sky mentioned in Genesis as separating the waters above and the waters below. A barrier. This concept may be connected to the function of Shu (the Egyptian god of the air), who created a space between Geb (the Egyptian god of the earth) and his sister/lover Nu (the Egyptian goddess of the sky) to prevent them from conceiving.

Rationalism

(Philosophy) The doctrine that genuine knowledge is not established by sense-experience, or at least not by sense-experience alone, and so is wholly or at least to a significant extent a priori. Contrast with empiricism.

Religion

A cultural institution dedicated to propagating a particular view of absolute truth in order to fulfill the human need to find meaning in life. True religion is completely different from dogma or a codified creed. A creed is a collective belief, and therefore resides in the Nephesh. True religion involves a personal alliance to indisputable spiritual, metaphysical, or mundane factors. It is the celebration of the spirit.

Soul

(General mystical term) The passive spirit in all things, believed to transcend all things, including death. In alchemy, a piece of the First Matter. In Thelema, the hidden spark inside of all humans: Hadit. Considered to be beyond the four material elements and therefore conceptualized as a fifth element or Quintessence. The letter Shin in Hermetic Qabalah. See Quintessence.

©2008-2013 Gerald del Campo. Edited by Sheta Kaey.

Gerald del Campo has authored three books on the subject of Thelema: A Heretic’s Guide to Thelema, New Aeon Magick: Thelema Without Tears, and New Aeon English Qabalah Revealed. He is a photographer, musician and CEO for the Order of Thelemic Knights, the first Thelemic charitable organization. You can visit his blog at http://solis93.livejournal.com and his websites at http://thelemicknights.org and http://egoandtheids.com. Gerald formerly served as Senior Managing Editor of Rending the Veil.

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